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Sandhill Crane Dance

Sandhill Crane Dance

North Crane Pond Dancing is key to courtship. They stretch their wings, pump their heads, bow and leap into the air in agraceful, energetic dance
Sandhill Crane in flight

Sandhill Crane in flight

North Crane Pond Of the six subspecies: Lesser, Greater and Canadian sandhill cranes migrate and would be found in Bosque
Sandhill Cranes in flight

Sandhill Cranes in flight

North Crane Pond Sandhill cranes are the most common of all the world's cranes
Sandhill Cranes in flight

Sandhill Cranes in flight

North Crane Pond overlooking the Chupadera Mountains When flying, a sandhill crane will spread its wings, extends its neck and hold its long black legs out.
Sandhill Cranes ready for liftoff

Sandhill Cranes ready for liftoff

Cranes lean forward just prior to lift off at North Crane Pond
Sandhill Cranes in flight

Sandhill Cranes in flight

North Crane Pond overlooking the Chupadera Mountains A crane can stay aloft for many hours, requiring only occasional flapping of its wings
The Landing

The Landing

Snow Goose touchdown Farm Deck, North Loop Snow Geese breed in the Arctic Tundra and winter in farmlands, lakes and coastal areas in the American south, southwest and east coast.
Rush hour traffic

Rush hour traffic

Snow Geese jockey for position Farm deck, North Loop Seen in flight, adults are white with jet black wing tips.
Snow Geese blur the sky

Snow Geese blur the sky

Snow Geese fill the sky over looking the Chupadera Mountains
Just Ducky

Just Ducky

A Ring Necked Duck paddles near the Observation blind, North Loop
Sandhill Crane stroll

Sandhill Crane stroll

North Crane Pond Depending on their location, they may preen themselves by rubbing mud on their feathers, giving them a reddish-brown appearance.
Sandhill Crane dash

Sandhill Crane dash

North Crane Pond To signal take off, cranes lower their heads, lean forward and take a short run to achieve flight.
Sandhill Crane in flight

Sandhill Crane in flight

North Crane Pond overlooking the Chupadera Mountains Cranes typically travel 200 - 300 miles in a day, but can reach 500 miles with a good tail wind.
Sandhill Crane mirror image

Sandhill Crane mirror image

North Crane Pond The lesser sandhill crane, which, at about 400,000 individuals, is the most plentiful crane alive today.
  • Sandhill Crane Dance
  • Sandhill Crane in flight
  • Sandhill Cranes in flight
  • Sandhill Cranes in flight
  • Sandhill Cranes ready for liftoff
  • Sandhill Cranes in flight
  • The Landing
  • Rush hour traffic
  • Snow Geese blur the sky
  • Just Ducky
  • Sandhill Crane stroll
  • Sandhill Crane dash
  • Sandhill Crane in flight
  • Sandhill Crane mirror image

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Bosque del Apache Birds in Motion

by Bill Yetz Photo

No bird soars too high if he soars with his own wings. -William Blake

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Guestbook for “Bosque del Apache Birds in Motion”

Name/Note Date

01/03/17

Fred Brown

Beautiful collection, again.

Bill Yetz Photo

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Welcome to my Fine Art Photography e-Galleries. I have been a nature photographer for over a decade. Based in the northeast I have had the great fortune of traveling across the US and Internationally. These Galleries showcase my favorite Landscape, Wildlife and Black & White …